Ellas (ALBUM II)

In the same investigative vein initiated a few years ago, Karen Paulina Biswell’s research about sexual identity weaves strong ties with the vegetal world, using it now as a powerful ally in her work. The vegetal world has always been bathed in mysteries, just like feminine sexuality. ”Vita in plantis es occulta,” wrote Saint Thomas Aquinas, which is why these occult memories generate totemism and fertility rites. But away from any archaism, Karen’s pieces, open to the “archaea” of a new feminism that would now consider itself to be more phenomenological than societal.

Karen Paulina Biswell associates such generative power to that of bees manifestation of the exchange and of the power of giving inherent to the natural world. Fusion operates. Even the bodies become vegetal, deploying the sumptuous “cathedralization” of bellies that shuffle, brush and whisper of vegetal life. What we know about the desire of women, most often, is that we know nothing about it, or so little. A paradox of the luscious corollas and a culture of silence in which bodies secrete and sensibilities bloom by the constant energy of a desire at work. A desire to be considered with the utmost seriousness and respect because it is now critical to our own survival. Mutatis Mutandis, while the things that need to be changed are changed, the secret of the plant remains fully vegetal; behind the silence of women is the key to the future of humanity.

“We also need to return to our sexual identities and learn how to inhabit them as frames, starting from that which can connect us to our environment, to others and primarily to ourselves. Rather than relying on any external device or technical Gestell*, we can approach the issue from the perspective of one’s morphology matching with our sexual identities, without letting these be reduced to a neutral,individual “whatever-they-be;” that way, we can maintain and cultivate our natural energies. Moreover, being sexually determined gives us an additional energy that allows us to resist subjectivization from any undifferentiated technological energy and to forge a humanly relational world to ensure coexistence between us without any domination or exclusion of the other living beings.” Lucy Irigaray and Michael Marden "Thinking Anew,”

Ellas (ALBUM II)

In the same investigative vein initiated a few years ago, Karen Paulina Biswell’s research about sexual identity weaves strong ties with the vegetal world, using it now as a powerful ally in her work. The vegetal world has always been bathed in mysteries, just like feminine sexuality. ”Vita in plantis es occulta,” wrote Saint Thomas Aquinas, which is why these occult memories generate totemism and fertility rites. But away from any archaism, Karen’s pieces, open to the “archaea” of a new feminism that would now consider itself to be more phenomenological than societal.

Karen Paulina Biswell associates such generative power to that of bees manifestation of the exchange and of the power of giving inherent to the natural world. Fusion operates. Even the bodies become vegetal, deploying the sumptuous “cathedralization” of bellies that shuffle, brush and whisper of vegetal life. What we know about the desire of women, most often, is that we know nothing about it, or so little. A paradox of the luscious corollas and a culture of silence in which bodies secrete and sensibilities bloom by the constant energy of a desire at work. A desire to be considered with the utmost seriousness and respect because it is now critical to our own survival. Mutatis Mutandis, while the things that need to be changed are changed, the secret of the plant remains fully vegetal; behind the silence of women is the key to the future of humanity.

“We also need to return to our sexual identities and learn how to inhabit them as frames, starting from that which can connect us to our environment, to others and primarily to ourselves. Rather than relying on any external device or technical Gestell*, we can approach the issue from the perspective of one’s morphology matching with our sexual identities, without letting these be reduced to a neutral,individual “whatever-they-be;” that way, we can maintain and cultivate our natural energies. Moreover, being sexually determined gives us an additional energy that allows us to resist subjectivization from any undifferentiated technological energy and to forge a humanly relational world to ensure coexistence between us without any domination or exclusion of the other living beings.” Lucy Irigaray and Michael Marden "Thinking Anew,”

Ellas (ALBUM II) by Karen Paulina Biswell
Ellas (ALBUM II) by Karen Paulina Biswell
Ellas (ALBUM II) by Karen Paulina Biswell
Ellas (ALBUM II) by Karen Paulina Biswell
Ellas (ALBUM II) by Karen Paulina Biswell
Ellas (ALBUM II) by Karen Paulina Biswell
Ellas (ALBUM II) by Karen Paulina Biswell
Ellas (ALBUM II) by Karen Paulina Biswell
Ellas (ALBUM II) by Karen Paulina Biswell
Ellas (ALBUM II) by Karen Paulina Biswell
Ellas (ALBUM II) by Karen Paulina Biswell
Ellas (ALBUM II) by Karen Paulina Biswell
Ellas (ALBUM II) by Karen Paulina Biswell
Ellas (ALBUM II) by Karen Paulina Biswell
Ellas (ALBUM II) by Karen Paulina Biswell
Ellas (ALBUM II) by Karen Paulina Biswell